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Intersect Palm Springs to Feature 50 Exhibitors, Curated Spaces and Sculpture Garden

Intersect Palm Springs to Feature 50 Exhibitors, Curated Spaces and Sculpture Garden

Louis Stern Fine Arts will be exhibiting at the 2022 Intersect Palm Springs.

James Little featured in the 2022 Whitney Biennial

James Little featured in the 2022 Whitney Biennial

Congratulations to James Little as one of the 63 artists selected to the 2022 Whitney Biennial!

Review: Lorser Feitelson’s Allegorical Confessions, 1943-45 at Louis Stern Fine Arts

Review: Lorser Feitelson’s Allegorical Confessions, 1943-45 at Louis Stern Fine Arts

Written By Rachel Denniston

February 18, 2021

California Art Review of Lorser Feitelson’s Allegorical Confessions, 1943-45

Alfredo Ramos Martinez’s Astonishing ‘Flores Mexicanas’ On View At Dallas Museum Of Art

Alfredo Ramos Martinez’s Astonishing ‘Flores Mexicanas’ On View At Dallas Museum Of Art

by Chadd Scott

Alfredo Ramos Martinez’s Flores Mexicanas, on view now at the Dallas Museum of Art, reminds audiences instantly how inadequate “virtual” art experiences are when compared to the real thing. Nine feet tall. Twelve feet wide. Luscious in color. A gasp-inducing, ornate, hand-crafted frame.

Off the Grid: Print Portfolio by Mokha Laget

Off the Grid: Print Portfolio by Mokha Laget

Off the Grid: Print Portfolio by Mokha Laget opens in the Harnett Museum of Art, August 17, 2020, through July 7, 2021.

Going Beyond Geometry

Going Beyond Geometry

James Little’s Social Abstraction by William Corwin

In James Little’s five abstract canvases in oil and wax exhibited in the marble-clad Modernist lobby of 499 Park Avenue (on view July 20 through December 1, 2020), he explores the nature of contradiction with mathematical determination.

A Wedding Gift For Charles Lindbergh Goes Up On The Wall, At Last

A Wedding Gift For Charles Lindbergh Goes Up On The Wall, At Last

by Susan Stamberg

I'm a little uncomfortable about this essay. Texas is surging with COVID-19, and I'm transfixed by a painting at the Dallas Museum of Art. But if, like me, you crave something beautiful right now, then perhaps this will help.

It's a painting wrapped in politics, romance and mystery. The Dallas Museum of Art (closed now, but with online offerings that exhibit its treasures) is making this picture the centerpiece of a show called "Flores Mexicanas: Women in Modern Mexican Art."

HEATHER HUTCHISON with Barbara Rose

HEATHER HUTCHISON with Barbara Rose

Heather Hutchison was born in 1964 in Corvallis, Oregon. Her father was an itinerant caricaturist and the family traveled through California, Oregon, and Arizona, finally settling in Bisbee Arizona, six miles north of the Mexican border. She had a studio first in Manhattan, then in DUMBO, Brooklyn. Since 2001, she has worked in Saugerties, New York where she lives with her husband artist Mark Thomas Kanter and son Dante.

Valley of Gold: Southern California and the Phantasmagoric

Valley of Gold: Southern California and the Phantasmagoric

featuring work by Helen Lundeberg, Lorser Feitelson, Karl Benjamin, Lee Mullican and Frederick Hammersley

Kasmin Gallery, March 5— April 11, 2020

Kasmin is pleased to present Valley of Gold: Southern California and the Phantasmagoric, curated by Sonny Ruscha Granade and Harmony Murphy. Valley of Gold explores the aesthetic legacy of the European surrealists and others who worked with similar sensibilities on the art of Southern California. Examining the influence of this charged period, the exhibition traces how its effects percolated through later movements such as California abstraction, conceptual art, and Light and Space.

The Lasting Influence of Mexico’s Great Muralists

The Lasting Influence of Mexico’s Great Muralists

By Peter Schjeldahl

The title of a thumpingly great show at the Whitney, “Vida Americana: Mexican Muralists Remake American Art, 1925-1945,” picks an overdue art-historical fight. The usual story of American art in those two decades revolves around young, often immigrant American aesthetes striving to absorb European modernism. A triumphalist tale composed backward from its climax—the postwar success of Abstract Expressionism—it brushes aside the prevalence, in the Depression thirties, of politically themed figurative art: social realism, more or less, which became ideologically toxic with the onset of the Cold War.

Why Mexican Modernism Is so Relevant Right Now

Why Mexican Modernism Is so Relevant Right Now

by Alina Cohen

Figurative painting is the dominant aesthetic mode. Artists feud about how radical the government should be. Fights about aesthetic patronage and censorship dominate news headlines. These themes, which are at the core of “Vida Americana”—a new show at the Whitney Museum of American Artthat examines Mexican modernism from 1925 to 1945—also represent some of our contemporary art world’s most pressing issues.

“Vida Americana” is part of a growing group of major exhibitions that explore Mexico’s influence on international modernism. Altogether, these shows argue that Mexico’s cultural interchange with the U.S. and Europe radically shifted the relationship between artists and politics, reconsidered the role of craft in fine art, and gave birth to Abstract Expressionism.

Mexican Muralists Changed the Course of 20th-Century American Art. A New Exhibit Explores Their Influence

Mexican Muralists Changed the Course of 20th-Century American Art. A New Exhibit Explores Their Influence

BY ANNA PURNA KAMBHAMPATY

Jackson Pollock’s best-known influences include European greats like Pablo Picasso and Joan Miró. But often overlooked is the artist’s time at New York’s Experimental Workshop, founded in 1936 by David Alfaro Siqueiros, who along with Diego Rivera and José Clemente Orozco made up “los tres grandes” who led the postrevolution Mexican muralism movement. Siqueiros founded the Workshop in New York City in 1936, guided by the philosophy that in order to make truly radical art, artists must shed old practices and pioneer completely new techniques. As an impressionable young painter there, Pollock was exposed to the approach of pouring and dripping paint onto canvases, more than a decade before he would introduce his first “drip paintings” in 1947. 

A new exhibition at the Whitney Museum of American Art, Vida Americana: Mexican Muralists Remake American Art, 1925–1945, aims to rectify such oversights. The show, which runs from February through mid-May, shines a light on the Mexican artists whose politically charged, populist work shaped some of the most significant American artists of the 20th century, from Pollock to Philip Guston. The exhibit places Mexican works next to those of Americans who borrowed, often heavily, from their themes and methods. “Sometimes we talk about American art or Mexican art, but these are really fictitious borders, frontiers that do not actually exist,” says Marcela Guerrero, assistant curator of the exhibit.

Heather Hutchison: Mid Air

Heather Hutchison: Mid Air

February 20 – July 24, 2020 at Winston Wächter Fine Art

Winston Wächter Fine Art, New York is excited to announce Mid Air, an exhibition of new work by Heather Hutchison. These luminous abstract paintings meditate on light, air, and natural phenomena in our changing world and climate.

Mexico, Not France, Had ‘Most Profound And Pervasive’ Impact On 20th Century American Art, Whitney Curator Discovers

Mexico, Not France, Had ‘Most Profound And Pervasive’ Impact On 20th Century American Art, Whitney Curator Discovers

by Natasha Gural

A replica of the contentious Man, Controller of the Universe mural bursts from a full wall on the fifth-floor galleries at the Whitney Museum of American Art in New York for Vida Americana: Mexican Muralists Remake American Art, 1925–1945, opening to the public on February 17. A highlight of the groundbreaking exhibition featuring around 200 works by about 60 artists, the chilling reproduction is distressingly relevant in today’s fragmented and fragile sociopolitical climate.

Beyond the wall: a golden period of exchange between Mexican and US artists is revisited in new show

Beyond the wall: a golden period of exchange between Mexican and US artists is revisited in new show

by GABRIELLA ANGELETI

The profound influence Mexican artists had on the American avant-garde in the two decades following the end of the Mexican Revolution in 1920 is to be revealed this month in a groundbreaking exhibition at the Whitney Museum of American Art. Vida Americana: Mexican Muralists Remake American Art 1925-45, which explores the overlooked creative exchange between Mexican and US artists in that era, will “reorient the understanding of art history”, says the show’s curator Barbara Haskell.

The Mexican muralists who shaped modern American art

The Mexican muralists who shaped modern American art

by Anne Quito, CNN

Diego Rivera is widely recognized for his influence on modern art. Active in the first half of the 20th century, he was collected by the Rockefellers, displayed at leading galleries, and remains the most expensive Latin American artist today.
While he and his wife Frida Kahlo were the most famous artistic exports from their home country of Mexico, they were not the only ones. As an eye-opening new exhibition at the Whitney Museum in New York argues, it was a group of Mexican artists -- and not so much the European modernists like Pablo Picasso or the cast of French Impressionists -- who shaped post-war art in the US.
 

Enigma Variations: The Work of Helen Lundeberg

Enigma Variations: The Work of Helen Lundeberg

by Andrew Berardini

Let’s begin at the end. Pass through the hard edges of her country and the science fiction of her colors, and as the decades fall away we’ll finally return to a room in California and the painter herself, summoning the cosmos. Helen Lundeberg finished her last painting nine years before her death in 1999, a few months shy of ninety-one. Almost seven decades earlier, in 1934, aged twenty-six or so, Lundeberg wrote with her teacher and lover (later husband) Lorser Feitelson a manifesto for New Classicism, a punchy critique of Surrealism.

Best Of WeHo: Art, Cannabis, Dry Cleaners

Best Of WeHo: Art, Cannabis, Dry Cleaners

by Henry E. (Hank) Scott

We asked and you answered. This is the first in a series of announcements over the next few days of the winners in WEHOville’s annual Best of WeHo contest. Coming soon will be Best Of listings of pet services, spas, hair salons, gyms, and restaurants, to cite a few of the categories. And with our final announcement, we’ll announce the winner of a weekend stay in a beautifully redesigned room at the Mondrian Los Angeles, which graciously offered that prize to encourage West Hollywood residents to call out their favorite local businesses to friends and neighbors.

Zimmerli Art Museum Presents Dimensionism: Modern Art in the Age of Einstein

Zimmerli Art Museum Presents Dimensionism: Modern Art in the Age of Einstein

by Cynthia Medina

A groundbreaking exhibit that explores how modern art was influenced by advances in science, from Einstein’s theory of relativity to newly powerful microscopic and telescopic lenses, is on display at the Zimmerli Art Museum as part of an initiative bring together the study of art and science at Rutgers-New Brunswick.

Jess, a West Coast Visionary

Jess, a West Coast Visionary

by John Yau

SAN FRANCISCO — I first became aware of the artist Jess (1923 – 2004) in the late 1960s, when I bought a copy of Robert Duncan’s The Opening of the Field (1960) at the Grolier Poetry Book Shop on Plympton Street, near Harvard Square, in Cambridge, Massachusetts. Jess’s ink drawing was the frontispiece of that singular volume, which was part of my introduction to the existence of alternatives to official verse culture. Although I went on reading Duncan, I did not see any more of Jess’s art until I came to New York in the mid-1970s and saw his work at the Odyssia Gallery, where I also saw pieces by Irving Petlin and, later, Robert Birmelin for the first time.

Find your niche: "Alcoves 20/20"

Find your niche: "Alcoves 20/20"

by Michael Abatemarco

When the New Mexico Museum of Art opened to the public as the Art Gallery of the Museum of New Mexico on Nov. 24, 1917, its mission was to provide the contemporary artists of the day with a venue for showing their work. Regional artists could put their names on a list and their work would be exhibited in one of several ground-floor niche galleries, or alcoves. The open-door policy persisted for decades until curated shows took over completely in the 1950s. Alcoves 20/20, which opens on Friday, Aug. 9, pays homage to the museum’s original vision by showcasing the work of 30 New Mexico-based artists. (The artists’ work appears in six rotations featuring five artists at a time, spanning a year in total.)

 

 

1960s California Hard-Edge : Karl Benjamin, Lorser Feitelson and Helen Lundeberg

1960s California Hard-Edge : Karl Benjamin, Lorser Feitelson and Helen Lundeberg

Review by John Stephens, August 2018

Flowers Gallery, Kingsland Road, London. July 5–September 8, 2018

The summer months - July and August - are often a time when gallery-goers expect to see mixed shows of gallery artists; it’s generally down-time in the gallery cycle. But over the last few years there’s been a trend for galleries to curate summer shows that are more enterprising. And so it is with the current exhibition at Flowers, of hard-edge abstract painters from America’s west coast, 1960s California Hard-Edge, which runs until September 8th.  It is, in fact, an exchange show in collaboration with Louis Stern Fine Arts in Hollywood, California, which represents the three artists on show and is simultaneously putting on a show of British abstract painters from the same period: Bernard Cohen, Michael Kidner and Richard Smith.

Carlos Cruz-Diez, Venezuelan pioneer of kinetic art who added color to L.A. streets, dies

Carlos Cruz-Diez, Venezuelan pioneer of kinetic art who added color to L.A. streets, dies

By ASSOCIATED PRESS

CARACAS, Venezuela  — Carlos Cruz-Diez, a leading Venezuelan artist who won international acclaim for his work with color and the style known as kinetic art, has died in Paris. He was 95.

Feitelson and Lundeberg Catalogues Raisonnés

Feitelson and Lundeberg Catalogues Raisonnés

Interview with Lauren A. Ross on behalf of the Feitelson/Lundeberg Art Foundation

What are the chronologies of the catalogue raisonné projects for Feitelson and Lundeberg?

The Foundation placed a call for collectors in 2012. At that time we also began amassing data, photographing all work still in the Foundation’s collection, and visiting museums and private collections. I visited the Archives of American Art to view the Feitelson/Lundeberg Papers in 2012 and 2018, and visited the UCLA archives to view the Tobey C. Moss Gallery Records on Feitelson and Lundeberg. These archives have all been instrumental in filling gaps in provenance and locating information on untraced works. 

Helen Lundeberg by Annabel Osberg

Helen Lundeberg by Annabel Osberg

Helen Lundeberg (1908-1999) wrote in 1942 that her aim was “to calculate, and reconsider, every element in a painting with regard to its function in the whole organization.” The renowned Post-Surrealist’s precision of shape, color and composition is amply displayed in “Helen Lundeberg: Interiors” at Louis Stern Fine Arts, which includes 15 scenes she painted between 1943-1980.

From the Shadows to the Spotlight: Masterworks by California’s Unknown Women Artists

From the Shadows to the Spotlight: Masterworks by California’s Unknown Women Artists

By Meher McArthur

In the painting of Olvera Street currently on view in the exhibition “Something Revealed: California Women Artists Emerge, 1860-1960” at the Pasadena Museum of History, the symbolism of masculine dominance may have been unintentional, but it is extremely poignant considering the subject of the exhibition. The old cobbled street is shown on a quiet morning. A saleswoman perches uncomfortably on a stool in front of her terra cotta pot stall and gazes over at two men browsing the pots across the way. Behind her, another shopkeeper stands in her doorway beside a display of ceramic vases and jars as a woman in a headscarf strolls along the sidewalk. In front of the seated woman, a small child approaches a dog who appears oblivious to them all as he busily scratches an itch. Above them all in the center of the painting and thrusting into the sky is the tower of the Los Angeles City Hall, a building completed in 1928– the only clue that dates the oil painting. At the bottom right-hand corner is the artist’s signature “V.C.M. Staples” – a genderless mark that reveals next to nothing about the artist who painted this masterful portrait of the heart of Los Angeles.

Something Revealed: California Women Artists Emerge, 1860-1960

Something Revealed: California Women Artists Emerge, 1860-1960

September 29, 2018 – March 31, 2019 at Pasadena Museum of History

Pasadena Museum of History presents Something Revealed; California Women Artists Emerge, 1860-1960, a fine art exhibition of over 250 works offering a new appreciation of the artists who defied gender and expectation in an era of inequality. Although some of the featured artists have achieved name recognition, the exhibition will focus on historically important yet unknown and underappreciated California artists and the role they played in shaping the arts and culture in California spanning 100 years.

Claremont Museum of Art: : Intersecting at the Edge

Claremont Museum of Art: : Intersecting at the Edge

by Annabel Osberg

July 13–September 16, 2018

Three abstract painters converge like an artistic Venn diagram in “Intersecting at the Edge” at the Claremont Museum of Art, where paintings by the late Karl Benjamin, a principal figure of the California Hard-edge painting movement, are displayed alongside abstractions by contemporary artists Heather Gwen Martin and Eric Zammitt. Curated by Dion Johnson, an abstract painter and former student of Benjamin, this show educes singularities and commonalities among its trio of constituent artists while suggesting Hard-edge painting’s enduring legacy.

Flight or Alchemy: Abstract painters Joe Overstreet and James Little subvert the demands of representation.

Flight or Alchemy: Abstract painters Joe Overstreet and James Little subvert the demands of representation.

By Barry Schwabsky

“Abstraction represents self-determination and free will.” So avowed the painter James Little at a recent panel discussion held in conjunction with an exhibition of works by his fellow painter Joe Overstreet, but with the broader purpose of examining the question of “Black Artists and the Abstraction Idiom.” Little’s ringing declaration of aesthetic independence was couched in a language both explicitly political (self-determination being a right underwritten by the United Nations in its 1960 Declaration on the Granting of Independence to Colonial Countries and Peoples, which held that “All peoples have the right to…freely pursue their economic, social and cultural development”) as well as theological (though the problem of free will has earlier roots, it became urgent when Christian thinkers had to explain the origin of sin and damnation in a world created by a perfect and benevolent God). The implication of Little’s statement is that abstract art, by eschewing the forms of representation through which political and religious narratives are conveyed, enacts and exemplifies a kind of self-emancipation.

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